Tagged: Teaching

The Economics of an ‘A Culture’

Non-educators discuss education by using the language of an economics lesson—analyzing the material impact of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. Public decision-makers assess a school’s value and teacher performance on ratings attached to standardized test scores. The political community seeks to reform education in terms of funding, privatization, policy, vouchers, and budget cuts. While recognizing these concepts have no connection to kids, educators also use business-related diction when referring to educational trends, college and career readiness, stakeholders, ownership, investment, portfolios, risk-taking, and assessment. Educators must be intentional and learner-focused, understanding how words and actions communicate core values.

Despite positive intentions, we have created a competitive, high stakes culture of success or failure. When we rank by grade point average or add merit to weighted grades, we assess students’ educational “worth.” Transcripts keep score but fail to identify what students know and can do. Online gradebooks turn reporting into nauseating stock market games.

We live in an ‘A Culture.’
In an A Culture, when students sense Assessment they respond with Anxiety or Apathy. Reassessing our culture of learning is serious business…
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Writing With the Stars

We spend hours of our academic lives attempting to analyze and interpret the literary works of others. We strive define what an author’s text says, then determine what the writing means. While critical thinkers recognize the benefits of these literary discussions and classroom activities, occasionally we have to ask, “What does this matter?” Why dedicate so much time studying the words of authors whom will never share the truth? If we could simply ask Shakespeare if he intended to communicate what was recently Shmooped

The process is frustrating at times. It assigns students the role of the confused reader and authors as the untouchable expert. Learners in my high school English courses should consider themselves writers as well as readers. The most effective strategy I’ve used is to study our own work as literature. Here’s how. Continue reading

A Personalized Classroom Tour

On the eve of another school year’s opening day, I captured several images of the personalized learning environment students will enter in the morning. Welcome back to The Clubhouse!

Learners will immediately face choices and be challenged to determine where they will learn best each day. Those searching for an uncomfortable, cumbersome, Industrial Age desk are out of luck in room A15–I ditched the last three desks during this year’s back-to-school renovation. However, there are plenty of excellent work spaces available.

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Clipboards and Conversations: PD with Purpose

I recently had the rare opportunity (and pleasure) to observe my colleagues’ classrooms throughout two school days. In total, I entered twenty-four classrooms and, after reflective collaboration with the rest of the leadership team, enjoyed conversations about nearly fifty observational rounds. While out on tour, my purpose was to collect data about the amount of differentiation and level of rigor our students experience in a typical day of high school to provide direction for future staff development. What I recorded on a clipboard may prove valuable; but what I experienced has already made a significant impact.

My greatest take-away is the need for all stakeholders to increase innovative thought in our vision of school–by students, teachers, and administrators. Students should spend more time creating, not simply doing, in a school day. Teachers should be coaching more than instructing. Administrators should attack the status quo, think big and ask, “why not?” All leaders should empower others by asking more questions than providing answers. We can make significant improvements to what we do and how we do it. So what holds us back? Continue reading

Weekend Work and Wonder

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Ahhh…the weekend has arrived. Time for Saturday morning cartoons and eating breakfast with my kids. Then, I typically check my messages, catch #satchatwc on Twitter, and prepare to go out for a run before college basketball or football brings our living room to life. Weekends are family time–a time for play.

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Therefore, I give little homework over the weekend. If anything, I set direction for the following week, possibly providing a teaser to build anticipation and a reason to return to class. Students may use the time to read for pleasure or increase their understanding of what we covered throughout the week.

I do not use weekends to recover from a long week; I use them to plan for the next week. Although that mentality does not sound very fun, I ease my active mind by taking time in advance to get organized. We can all agree: there’s simply not enough time during the week to accomplish everything we want. So, I do as much front-loading as possible. I try to catch up on providing feedback to students, plan differentiated lessons as necessary, and monitor student progress. By Monday morning, I want to see the big picture for the week. That being said, it is impossible to plan every day in advance without student contact–an inflexible trap many teachers fall into.

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Holidays are a little different. Extended vacations are a time to catch up on things I want to do, like reading and writing and taking family adventures. These are additional opportunities to learn and expand our life experiences, which enriches our education. We can travel, shop, explore, laugh, and grow. This is what life is all about.

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*Day 27 of the TeachThought #reflectiveteacher 30-day blogging challenge

Adjusting the Tee: Respect the Learning Process

Tee Work

Tee Work

As my Twitter handle @RESP3CTtheGAME indicates, I am passionate about baseball–a dedicated student and teacher of the game. Baseball is more cerebral than most sports, not necessarily won by the bigger, faster, stronger team. I crave the competition, strategy, and team success; there is no greater reward than watching players execute the skills emphasized in practice. Baseball is a dignified team sport–especially when played the right way–but those who understand its intricacies know baseball is also a game of individual failure, constant adjustment, and mental combat. Fighting these demons requires sustained focus, patience, and a growth mindset. This is where we lose many participants over time, be it on the field or in a classroom. Learners must be willing to overcome educational adversity and constructive discomfort in order to improve.

In my roles of high school teacher and varsity baseball coach, I attempt to create memorable, brilliant (potentially award-winning?) practice and lesson plans. I love strategically differentiating to meet everyone’s needs, while adding enough variety to maintain enthusiasm. I do not want practice to feel boring, tedious, or laborious–the negative connotation of work. Reality reminds me that the majority of those involved want to skip the preparation and get right to the performance. One of the greatest challenges of any coach or teacher is to get participants to invest in the value of practice time.

Allow me to introduce my coaching staff…

Anyone who has attended one of my baseball camps or practices around the batting cage knows that after I introduce each member of the coaching staff, I present my top instructor… the hitting tee. He gives specific, immediate, continuous feedback; he is flexible, patient, and adjustable; he is always willing to put in extra time without expecting recognition. These characteristics also separate the master teacher from the rest of a staff. Despite the impressive qualifications, even the master teacher must show results to validate effectiveness and earn respect. So, we allow the tee to do the teaching.

We talkin‘ about practice

Some of the most physically gifted athletes overlook the value of tee work. They find it mindless, repetitive, and pointless–an insult to their abilities. Many consider it a child’s toy, a prop used by beginners incapable of hitting live pitching. As I passionately speak of fundamentals, discipline, and work ethic, players hear, “blah-blah-coach-speak-here-we-go-again-blah.” They know better than to roll their eyes, but I see doubt in faces of nonbelievers. Peers look at an invested teammate as an overachiever, or Coach’s pet, rather than a hard worker attempting to avoid a slump.

In an ideal world, baseball players and students would arrive ready to practice–eager to learn. Obviously, this is not always realistic, so we must initiate a level of excitement. This happens naturally in a culture of learning. Hitting consistent line drives to the far end of the cage is not as easy as it seems, but the goal is clear and attainable. The depth of the tunnel reminds the hitter to swing hard, but the ball will not travel properly unless the head remains steady and eyes focus softly on the point of contact. None of this is possible unless the lower half rotates and allowing the hips to clear a path for the hands to follow.

Every learner has strengths, where understanding and skill result in quick mastery. This comfort zone enables students to grasp concepts with relative ease. In hitting terms, this is finding the sweet spot. Given no specific instruction, hitters place the tee in the most comfortable position and hack away. I support these “feel good” reps knowing they increase confidence, build muscle memory, and identify individual strengths. However, learning stagnates when unforced beyond a comfort zone; fear of failure inhibits growth. If only pitchers were more considerate in delivering the ball to the sweet spot with regularity; unfortunately, stepping into the batter’s box is an unpredictable, overwhelming test at times. The enemy scouts our weaknesses and attacks our flaws. Nine players on defense versus one hitter doesn’t seem fair.

Many students approach their academic reps in the same way. They use the most comfortable–often apathetic–shortcut, through the formative process. They fall into a routine of compliance to appease the teacher and keep parents satisfied, especially where points are awarded. An even greater challenge is awarding no points for practice work, especially in a world where grades dictate student “worth.” Will this be graded? Does this count? How much is this worth?

Teachers, coaches, and parents must work with students to shatter this harmful mindset. Yes, it counts–more than any quantifiable grade, percentage, or average–but this is where teachers need to make sure students and their parents understand the value of the learning process. If practice is perceived as worthless, it is disrespectful to students and detrimental to a culture of learning. Formative practice is where learning occurs; this is the time for interaction and growth.

Those who respect the game of baseball, honor the importance of preparation. They find beauty in the art of practice. Classroom learning must be purposeful in relation to course standards. It should be interactive, engaging, and (dare I say?) fun. When students refuse to accept the value of practice, they turn the process into a points game. Maybe the class work is too easy, mindless, or repetitive; they can test without doing any work. Maybe the work is not tied to any standards. The teacher assigns homework because that’s what is expected; there is no clear rationale for completing perceived busy work. So, students rush to complete the assignment, copy a peer’s answers, or accept a zero–none of which prepares them for game time. When formative assessment is calculated to determine an average, the final grade is not an accurate indicator of learning.

Time to reconsider the educational purpose behind instructional practices, home work, and assessment. Time for educators to adjust the tee.

Tee Time

Tee Time

 

Adjusting the tee

Teachers tell students to be more creative but use the same lessons, tests, and plans every year. Schools tell teachers to be innovative, while expecting educators to increase standardized test scores and stick to the curriculum. We have predetermined outcomes that control learning, yet complain about kids’ lack of creativity. Children have wild imaginations (maybe video games are beneficial), but do not have the time nor freedom to express their creativity.

Learning, like tee work, requires the complex thought process of visualization. Hitters must conceptualize scenarios to discover the feel of staying on top of a high fastball, or driving a pitch on the outside corner. Reset. Move the tee out–then in–to simulate various points of contact. Initially, hitters might need situational prompts from a coach, but if effectively modeled, visualization becomes an art. Growth requires multiple opportunities for success–a full bucket of balls. Stretch the imagination. How does it feel to drive in the winning run with two strikes and the game on the line? What if it’s an off-speed pitch? Adjust. Make learning a memorable event–celebrate growth.

While the real education takes place throughout the formative stages of each unit, if treated properly, the final product will reflect successful growth. Formative feedback should guide further instruction and provide clear indication of preparedness for the summative assessment–game time. If I have done my job of providing multiple opportunities while communicating continuous, target-specific feedback, students should want to showcase their learning. In my classroom, such assessments are known as “celebrations of knowledge.”

Celebration of Knowledge

Celebration of Knowledge

 

Allow space for failure and recovery

Learning is messy. The growth process must be nurtured with care. No one wants to be evaluated on every swing in practice. Even with the best intentions, a batter inevitably strikes the rubber tube with such force practice stops to locate the source of the embarrassing thwack. It’s bad enough having to pick up the tee in front of teammates, let alone the judgmental eyes of a coach. As difficult as it is to resist the teachable moment, sometimes I have to step back and allow a hitter to work through his flaws. Proud or stubborn competitors don’t always seek a coach’s advice. The tee provides ample feedback. The hitter makes corrections. Following failure or success, I ask what he learned from the hitting instructor. Self-assessment and verbalization of the learning create ownership of the lesson. The hitter will adapt in much the same way during a game when isolated in the batter’s box.

Such cognition is powerful; this hitter may share his learning with teammates through understanding only one with experience can express. A partner can make helpful suggestions or simply provide support by loading the tee with another ball. The team builds a unique culture during practice, which should transfer to the dugout and onto the field. The chatter around a batting cage highlights my summers in much the same way an active classroom composes the soundtrack of the school year.

 

Join the Culture of Learning team–dominate the Major Leagues of Education. Lead a team where everyone shares a vision of success, outworks the competition, and earns playing time. But we must careful with our analogies. There are plenty of games to enjoy in life; if we make learning a priority in education, we will stop playing the game of school.

 

*Day 21 of @Teachthought #reflectiveteacher 30-day blogging challenge

Reflecting on Student Reflection

Rick Wormeli reminds us, “The punishment for not doing work is to do the work.” The unjust act of lowering grades due to when work is completed merely damages morale; it does not motivate. I refuse to factor a behavior into an academic grade, so when students do not hand an assignment in on time, I torture them by continuously expecting them to get it to me. I need evidence of learning before I can assess proficiency and I am well aware of the mathematical injustice of the zero (especially when calculating averages on a 100 point scale). The expectation is that each student complete the assignment–which must be perceived as purposeful to learning and a respectful use of time.

With this in mind, I created a late work cover letter. It is hot pink and obnoxious, but allows students to complete work without penalty. The form letter is light-hearted but highly reflective in holding students accountable for their learning process. It also provides the teacher with a hard-to-miss paper trail for student portfolios.

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At the end of each quarter, students prepare a self-assessment reflecting on their performance for the quarter. I have students complete the rubric and support their claim with evidence of their efforts. I also urge students to complete the form with the person who cares most about their education in mind.

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Again, this is a point of accountability, much of which is behavior-related; it communicates nothing about what students know and can do, but pushes them to think about factors impacting their level of success. The self-assessment is where I tend to open parent-teacher conferences. Parents love reading the sincere comments from the perspective of their child. Students are typically critical of their efforts. When students can communicate areas where they know improvement is needed, they can plan strategies for growth. In situations where students need to be challenged to refocus their goal setting at the close of the year, I enjoy reading responses to Finish Strong: Self Reflection prompts.

The most powerful way students can reflect on learning is through the metacognitive process. My favorite and most informative assessments are ones in which students communicate evidence of growth. Google Docs and Microsoft Word have comment functions where writers can highlight revised portions of their work and provide the rationale for change. This is easy for me to assess and lends clarity to the depth of learning.

Deep Level Revision with Reflection

The blue exam below could be used in any class–simply shift the evidence based on course content. The questions ask students to reflect on how they “learned with a purpose” throughout the year (or semester). They state a claim and support it with evidence and reasoning. This is the easiest way for students to show what they know and can do with their learning. You may also notice the student-friendly rubric. Students compete to supply me with the criteria I will use to assess the level of proficiency for each standard, another reflective exercise.

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Here is another example of the type of assessment I have used as a World Literature final exam:

Purpose: To reflect on and express 2nd semester learning

LEARNING WITH A PURPOSE: Essay Prompt

Please reflect on your learning throughout second semester regarding course content, literature, and self-understanding. Make specific references to knowledge you gained through research, reading, and discussion

Students have to prepare–not study–for this exam. They appreciate that. This reflective practice also eliminates a student’s temptation to cheat and a teacher’s temptation to take the scan-tron shortcut.