Tagged: Teacher

What it Means to Respect the Game

When I first opened a Twitter account, I figured I would explore the links and resources–follow some educational experts and gather information digitally. Like many others, I gained the confidence to network in small doses. Then it became habit to check the feed and lurk on various hashtags and edchats. Before I knew it, I was a connected educator and a regular on several chats. Now, I follow nearly 2000 educators; I am part of a professional learning network.

When I created a Twitter account, I needed a handle that represents my identity and integrity. Those who follow me on Twitter probably recognize my handle @RESP3CTtheGAME more than my name. Ironically, what began as my integrity has become the identity of my digital footprint. Tweeps know they have to accommodate a 15 character handle (I apologize; I had no idea anyone would interact with me. Seriously!). However, they may not know is what it means. Continue reading

Promoting a Culture of Learning in 10 Steps

At the end of every school week our teachers receive a bulletin which provides valuable updates, cites interesting educational research, recognizes staff accomplishments, and highlights upcoming events. The format remains the same but new content is presented. The one constant is the series of four questions intended to guide our practice and reinforce our mission statement: As the faculty and staff of a comprehensive high school, we will provide opportunities to all students giving them the skills needed to better themselves and society.

Guiding Questions:

1. What do we expect our students to learn?

2. How will we know they have learned it?

3. How will we respond to students who are not learning?

4. How will we respond to students who already know it?

These four questions have provoked some of the most stimulating and challenging professional conversations I have experienced in eighteen years of professional development. Six years ago, Dr. Tom Guskey opened our school year with a memorable inservice presentation by sharing his wisdom and expertise in healthy grading practices. As a result, the district formed a committee–of which I was thrilled to be part–to research, discuss, and establish a philosophy of best practices for instruction and grading. The brilliant work of Wormeli, Reeves, O’ Connor, Marzano, DuFour, Wiggins, Tomlinson, Wiliam, and Guskey–among other educational experts–inspired my teaching and affirmed my classroom philosophy (learn with a purpose). After numerous drafts and revisions, the committee published a 6-12 grading document which our learning community continues to review. The most positive improvements include:

  • the elimination of zeros and extra credit
  • grades indicate achievement only
  • behaviors and work habits are reported separately with criteria identified on a citizenship rubric
  • distinguishing between formative, benchmark, and summative assessments (as online grading categories)
  • common summative assessments and consistent reporting in like courses (taught by multiple teachers)
  • a reassessment policy for summative assessments

While teachers continue to make significant progress in building workable classroom models, some have struggled to transition from a traditional mindset of grading and instruction. The cause of this discrepancy is mostly due to varying interpretations of the grading guidelines document. The research highlights what Frank Noschese identifies as the spirit of standards-based grading–a positive first step in a traditional model; however, traditional district practices remain obstacles impeding the path to officially commit to the philosophy. I anticipate many school districts can relate to being caught in a similar predicament.

So now what? In an educational world where so many conditions are predetermined, attitude is the one factor we as individuals are able to control. As more questions arise, teachers, administrators, parents, and students must seize the opportunity to create an environment with freedom for growth and expectations of achievement. Rather than resist this positive shift or complain about the inevitable challenges,  let’s act with the mindset in which all may thrive if we fully commit to a culture of learning.

In addition to expressing our own passion for teaching, love of our students, and zeal for learning, here are ten immediate, attainable solutions to impact our culture of learning.

1. Increase our reflective practice to contemplate what works or does not work and why.

Returning to the four guiding questions above is the best starting point. With respect to colleagues and friends, I challenge everyone to put their responses to the big questions in writing. And if those questions are too broad to start with, try answering these:

  • Have you and your department identified standards and learning targets for each course?
  • How are you assessing student performance on learning targets?
  • What are the reasons why students are not learning?
  • How effectively do you differentiate to provide opportunities for all students to learn?

2. Identify the purpose of each course and design units to meet course goals.

  • Determine the course content and performance standards
  • Craft essential questions to guide teaching and learning of standards
  • Break each unit into student-friendly learning targets (“I can” statements)
  • Create common summative assessments to measure learning
  • Plan lessons and formative assessments necessary to meet the learning target expectations of summative assessments

3. Define levels of proficiency so students can achieve course goals with the encouragement of a growth mindset.

Growth mindset

4. Stop grading on percentages or points (ex: 7/10 = 70% = C-).

Instead, assign a score based on a scale of proficiency (7-8/10 = PROFICIENT or  9-10/10 = ADVANCED). Teachers have professional freedom in this and may report as required by the online grading program or district guidelines (ex: 7/10 = PROF = B or 85 online).

5. Change the gradebook and reporting of grades.

  • set up categories to match course standards
  • report performance on standards separately, not as a single grade (traditional example: “Chapter 1 Test” does not communicate learning)
  • report online by standards (ex: Understands How to Multiply Fractions)
  • learning is continuous and should only be final at the end of a semester, which means stop averaging Quarter 1 with Quarter 2–allow for improvement, recovery, and growth

6. Stop grading and reporting everything online.

  • instead, provide constant feedback on specific learning targets without including a number or letter grade
  • teachers may record student performance but this should not factor into a grade
  • better yet, have students chart their progress and take greater ownership of their learning
  • homework should be considered practice which does not end until a student qualifies for assessment (semantics!)
  • determine necessary steps to learn a skill or concept
  • differentiate according to student needs

7. Make Learning Transparent.

  • post learning targets so they are always visible to students
  • emphasize the formative process to guide teaching and learning (continuous consideration of practice needed to become proficient on learning targets)
  • know expectations of summative assessment
  • students are accountable for monitoring their progress–there should be no surprises

8. Redesign assessments to compartmentalize learning.

  • arrange by learning targets and label headings accordingly
  • reassess portions only–the most recent learning gets reported
  • students must prove they are ready–promote the mindset that students have earned the opportunity to reassess (semantics!)
  • have students reflect on their growth or verbalize their learning
  • corrective assessment may be weaved into portions of the next assessment or formative piece (graded for individual students)
  • make sure rubrics reflect an accurate description of performance on standards

9. Network with other educators; learn from their expertise; be inspired.

There is no excuse for neglecting professional development. If you do not seek to improve your craft, you will fall behind. Yes, we lead busy lives, but teaching requires reflection and constant adjustment; it’s our responsibility to be lead learners. Twitter provides a constant flow of information and is always available for educators–begin by observing and then get involved. Follow #SBLchat and #COLchat, my personal favorites and an outlet for me to engage in conversation about my passion–student learning.

10. If you commit to one suggestion from this list, PLEASE make it this one:

In every conversation with students, teachers, administrators, and parents of the community, make a conscious effort to replace “grades, scores, and points” with “learning, progress, and growth.”

Taking these simple steps to promote a culture of learning–with an emphasis on learning–will benefit any school environment. The reality of acting on these improvements will undoubtedly:

  • guide daily instruction, planning, and assessment for teachers

  • empower students to learn with a growth mindset, rather than be point chasers

  • increase communication with parents about what their children know and can do

  • impact the public image of the learning community

In a Culture of Learning

In a Culture of Learning

Walking far beyond the pedestrian path

Image

Students Beware: Veteran Educator Feels Like a First Year Teacher

Every year we hear more accounts of teacher burnout, and at times, I’ve considered trying it, but the negative thoughts pass as I continue my exciting journey lifetime sentence through the high school hallways. I traditionally teach 4-5 different English courses from semester to semester, with a maximum of one repeated class per day. So, realistically, I don’t have time to get bored. This also means I have had the pleasure of teaching all brands of high school students in seventeen years. I could not enjoy a year without Visions in Literature and Composition–a class of bright-eyed 9th graders, who possess a zest for learning and untapped potential, but can’t avoid being freshmen. I love guiding juniors through the most important year in their educational journey and respect the content of Perspectives in World Literature and Composition. I am fully invested in Foundations of College Writing, my paperless senior writing course, in which I have become an edtech pioneer (self-proclaimed) by navigating a district 21st Century initiative, utilizing the power of Google Apps in our writing lab. My favorite class to teach has always been Communications, a public speaking course for upperclassmen. Despite my constructivist philosophy, no other class is as student-centered, simply due to the nature of its content.

Just as I was getting comfortable with the adjustments I have made to improve each course, an unexpected opportunity presented itself. At the end of last school year I was approached with the possibility of teaching Creative Writing, a course made popular by its previous teacher, my colleague and friend, who was moving on to another district. I always warned her students I was going to join the class as a student and write with them. And now I am, but the students are mine. Although I feel the uncertain thrill of a first-year teacher, there is renewed energy in my school day, and my passion for writing is awake after years of neglect.

Image

Where Do I Begin?

The emphasis of my professional development over the summer focused on writing, as I outlined a plan for teaching the extensive genres of Creative Writing. I sought the advice of two of my favorite experts–Kelly Gallagher and Penny Kittle–who reminded me to model more writing for students in each of my classes, not solely for Creative Writing. For teachers who have never read the works of Gallagher and Kittle, please find the time. They speak directly from the classroom with authentic voices and practical approaches for improved writing (and reading) instruction.

Despite the knowledge I gained through research, I struggled up to the final days of summer vacation, before finally sketching my plans for the course on the syllabus presented at the top of this post. Yes, that’s the syllabus I handed to students as they entered the classroom on opening day. I am not an artist, but I felt I had to be the first one in the class to take a chance. I was obligated to show–rather than tell–what to expect from the course they signed up for last year (actually, I felt obligated to warn them about what they were in for with me as their instructor). Although I was unsure of their initial reaction, I have since been rewarded with positive feedback from enthusiastic writers. Students respected my honesty, vulnerability, and energy, and as a result, now trust the guidance of a first-time Creative Writing instructor.

Where Do I Go From Here?

After gaining the support of students, I had to build a community of writers who encourage each other and feel secure sharing their work. The class is composed of twenty-two upperclassmen with varying interests, social circles, and writing backgrounds, so I anticipated a challenge. Our early activities (highlighted in my previous post), discussions, and sharing sessions broke down many barriers through laughter and storytelling. But I do not take much credit for the positive learning environment that has evolved; I work with great students–genuine, compassionate, young adults.

One early influential mission was to create six word memoirs as a means of getting to know each other. After a day spent introducing the assignment and brainstorming possibilities, I once again stepped out of my comfort zone and was first to share several final options. I projected three sentences on the smart board, mentioned what I intended to express, explained my conflicts, and asked for guidance.

Students provided constructive feedback in an intelligent conversation about the writer’s craft. Without teacher direction (I simply asked questions, clarified responses, and thanked contributors for their thoughts), students engaged in an unforced discussion of good writing, audience, purpose, effective punctuation, word choice,  and the power of one sentence. Confident writers (several AP students who have been exposed to complex literary analysis) first expressed specific details about quality writing, but surprisingly, some tentative writers shared observations; other students listened and processed in silence. Their commentary was inspiring. The result… my life in six words:

Walking far beyond the pedestrian path.

The twenty minute dialogue not only impacted the rest of the semester for our sixth hour team, it provided another highlight in my teaching career. Two days later, we sat in a circle and all twenty-three shared a six word memoir. Each author left the audience craving the rest of the story (which is a logical transition to our next mission: the autobiographical narrative). After admiring everyone’s contribution, I presented one final challenge to the class. We needed to publish our words–allow the world to hear our voices. Several visionary artists took a lead role, and within a week–after having us choose between five songs to accompany our words–produced a class video. The video might not signify much to a general YouTube audience, but it forever unifies our class. It also gave me something more impressive than my artistic syllabus (which I handed out…) to showcase during Back-to-School Night. As the parents of my writers watched intently, waiting for the words of their son or daughter to flash across the screen, they were overcome with emotion (several to tears). The power of the written word, combined with the potential of our children’s minds, made a bold statement about the quality of our educational system. I am proud to share our video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkymNjSz_OI with you. Enjoy.

Formative Assessment Using Google Forms

20130502-214928.jpgI recently completed a post about going paperless in my Foundations of College Writing course. As I continue to experience the benefits and efficiency of the Google Apps in the classroom, I want to share a simple strategy for formative assessment using Google Forms. The spreadsheet creates a visual model of every student’s research paper thesis statement. I provide meaningful, specific feedback (by color) to my seniors simply by reading one column of sentences and highlighting according to the standards on our writing rubric. Students immediately locate and compare their work to that of their peers, creating conversations before I start teaching.

RED=BEGINNING, ORANGE=DEVELOPING, YELLOW=PROFICIENT, GREEN=ADVANCED

Obviously, modeling is a best practice in the classroom. If you spend hours preparing writing lessons, which may or may not leave a lasting impact on learning, consider using the spreadsheets created by student responses to Google Forms. I use similar strategies to formatively assess samples of student work, including: effective introduction paragraphs, conclusions, organization of an argument, quote integration, word choice, and any other writing standards I wish to address. I insert comments to explain the rationale behind each writer’s assessment, but students often know the reasoning before I unveil the feedback.

This instant feedback teaches more in a mini-lesson than I can model or attempt to explain (especially for struggling writers). Students in Foundations need to see their words removed from the computer screen and hear their sentences read out loud. Immediately, they want to make adjustments before I even have a chance to comment or suggest improvements–so I let them. This promotes independent and critical thought. Writers gain confidence as they make minor revisions to attain proficiency, and beam with pride if their work is already green; they are not accustomed to receiving positive feedback–a major cause of their writing inhibitions. As revisions are completed, I change the color of highlighting for all to witness–simple, authentic, and lasting.