Tagged: Baseball

To Coach. To Teach.

file_001.jpeg

For two decades, I have enjoyed the honor of coaching varsity baseball and teaching high school communication arts courses. As I continue to grow in both roles, I recognize the influence coaching and teaching have had on each other in shaping my craft. Although I provide instruction in both positions, I prefer that students consider me their coach—a lead learner who wears the same uniform and is committed to a common purpose—dedicated to create opportunities, plan practice, support, adjust, guide, and root for every learner’s success. I want my learners to play with the content. Challenge their abilities. Learn to persist. Create meaningful outcomes. Celebrate victories. Enjoy a rewarding experience.

Great teachers possess characteristics of the most effective coaches. They are selfless, compassionate, and dedicated to help learners grow. Unlike most jobs, coaching and teaching become a lifestyle with a special responsibility and commitment to serve others. The distinguishing quality of a coach is through the actions taken to educate—the impact and connotation of its verb form: “to coach.”

Effective coaches combine their passion for the game with a keen sense of knowing their personnel: they learn the strengths and struggles of individuals; they understand how to motivate each player; they make sure everyone understands their role in the team’s success; they design a plan to give individuals paths for improvement and provide the team with its greatest opportunity for success. Coaches offer advice or make suggestions for improvement, then provide (even prioritize) the time for practice—a period of adjustment, reinforcement, support, and celebration. Players need time to learn, to increase mental confidence and work through mechanical flaws. They must experience failure, be challenged beyond personal expectations, and feel success in their growth process. How would a similar approach impact our students in the classroom? Continue reading

Advertisements

What it Means to Respect the Game

When I first opened a Twitter account, I figured I would explore the links and resources–follow some educational experts and gather information digitally. Like many others, I gained the confidence to network in small doses. Then it became habit to check the feed and lurk on various hashtags and edchats. Before I knew it, I was a connected educator and a regular on several chats. Now, I follow nearly 3,000 educators; I am part of a professional learning network.

When I created a Twitter account, I needed a handle that represents my identity and integrity. Those who follow me on Twitter probably recognize my handle @RESP3CTtheGAME more than my name. Ironically, what began as my integrity has become the identity of my digital footprint. Tweeps know they have to accommodate a 15 character handle (I apologize; I had no idea anyone would interact with me. Seriously!). However, they may not know is what it means. Continue reading