Category: Learning Community

Homework Questions: In Search of the Answer Key

Every hour of the school day, a number of students hustle into my classroom, focused, and eager to get to work. Before the bell rings to indicate the start of my class, students are already invested in their studies. Backpacks are open, paperwork out, and pencils urgently filling in blanks. I don’t even have to provide motivation or verbal cues. My students are great kids. They seek approval from parents and teachers. They have positive intentions toward success and a sincere desire to please.

What’s my secret? Continue reading

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Clipboards and Conversations: PD with Purpose

I recently had the rare opportunity (and pleasure) to observe my colleagues’ classrooms throughout two school days. In total, I entered twenty-four classrooms and, after reflective collaboration with the rest of the leadership team, enjoyed conversations about nearly fifty observational rounds. While out on tour, my purpose was to collect data about the amount of differentiation and level of rigor our students experience in a typical day of high school to provide direction for future staff development. What I recorded on a clipboard may prove valuable; but what I experienced has already made a significant impact.

My greatest take-away is the need for all stakeholders to increase innovative thought in our vision of school–by students, teachers, and administrators. Students should spend more time creating, not simply doing, in a school day. Teachers should be coaching more than instructing. Administrators should attack the status quo, think big and ask, “why not?” All leaders should empower others by asking more questions than providing answers. We can make significant improvements to what we do and how we do it. So what holds us back? Continue reading

Challenging Thought: Wisdom from a Former Student

Thanksgiving receives plenty of attention for traditional feasts, shopping, and family time; but for teachers, Thanksgiving week means more than a couple days off of work. It represents the opportunity to reflect and reconnect with former students.

Yesterday, as if posted on the school calendar, a former student stopped by at the end of my prep period. He told me about his current studies and adventures as a college sophomore. We exchanged stories and shared laughs. These reunions are my reward–my holiday bonus.

But conversations with this graduate always go deeper than catching up on life and reminiscing about old times. He wants to know how systems work and asks questions about education that challenge my thinking. He has always been a genuine learner, urged by intellectual curiosity. And he possesses one of the most observant, insightful, brilliant minds I have ever had the pleasure to teach (even when he was a freshman). The limitations of a traditional high school structure were the only obstacles in his education at the time. He exhausted our school’s offerings of Advanced Placement courses and conquered all standardized tests with ease. As anticipated, he needed the independence of college to thrive and be challenged intellectually.

So why do we continue to lack vision of the possibilities and impede the potential of our learners?

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What it Means to Respect the Game

When I first opened a Twitter account, I figured I would explore the links and resources–follow some educational experts and gather information digitally. Like many others, I gained the confidence to network in small doses. Then it became habit to check the feed and lurk on various hashtags and edchats. Before I knew it, I was a connected educator and a regular on several chats. Now, I follow more than 2500 educators; I am part of a professional learning network.

When I created a Twitter account, I needed a handle that represents my identity and integrity. Those who follow me on Twitter probably recognize my handle @RESP3CTtheGAME more than my name. Ironically, what began as my integrity has become the identity of my digital footprint. Tweeps know they have to accommodate a 15 character handle (I apologize; I had no idea anyone would interact with me. Seriously!). However, they may not know is what it means. Continue reading

Creating an Environment of Learner-Centered Culture

Week of February 9, 2015

The topic for this week’s #slowchatGSD is the LEARNING ENVIRONMENT of our school culture. Once we establish a safe, respectful, academically challenging environment in our individual classrooms, how might we unleash that energy into the hallways and throughout entire buildings?

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RADIATE: My One Word For 2015

Radiate

Last year, in order to TRANSCEND, I felt obligated to get involved in every opportunity that called for educational leadership. My learning grew exponentially, but so did my time commitments. As responsibilities overlapped on my calendar, I found myself rushing (often running) to the next entry on the agenda. That pace is exhausting but necessary at crucial points in life, especially with the motivation to transcend. I am proud of my efforts, but refuse to grow complacent; I know there is much more to accomplish in 2015. Now, with an established foundation of personal and professional understanding, I have a clearer vision going forward.

2015 cordially invites me to take personal action with the following expectations: to find and branch out from my center, extend my learning, reach out, share more experiences, emanate positive energy, shine…

RADIATE

Autumn Splendor

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Finding the Courage to Transcend in 2014

2014 one word

I cannot believe how many times I thought of TRANSCEND, My One Word, throughout 2014. When I wrote this post, I figured it would be fun to look back and find examples of moments I had to find the courage to transcend. What I did not realize at the time is that I set a direction for the year, challenged my learning, and forced myself to take action. All year, before I got complacent, I launched myself beyond my comfort zone in order to grow. Here’s a collection of my personal and professional development, involvement, and service. (The list is primarily for personal reflection and an artifact for my Educator Effectiveness documentation log; therefore, some links might be private)

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